Top 10 Amazing Things We Learned in 2014-2015

10.  Immediate feedback is a significant contributor to students’ academic performance and teachers’ professional growth.

9.  The language teachers use has the potential to direct or derail student approaches towards learning. This statement is equally true when replacing the words “teachers” and “student” with “administrators” and “teacher,” respectively.

8.  Not identifying and articulating a central focus for a school guarantees individuals will identify their own focus and follow it with fidelity.

7.  Most Essential Questions we have seen are not essential.

6.  Teachers need adequate and protected time to plan, collaborate, and build teams.

5.  Students surveyed cite adult approval as the number one motivator for high achievement and appropriate behavior–not PBIS or related incentives such as trinkets, tickets, candy, or food.

4.  Effective use of data as a continuous means of improvement by both educators and students is a foregoing myth–despite how much data are collected and available.

3.  Authentic PLCs rarely take place.

2.  An endless array of meetings on a variety of changing topics ensures that nothing will actually happen as a result.

1.  Assessment overkill diminishes effective instruction.

Disclaimers:  We acknowledge that many schools engage in authentic PLCs and use data effectively. Data, however, should be used throughout the year and not just in a final push in preparation for testing. Equally, students should be actively engaged in monitoring their own academic progress through effective data collection and analysis. Finally, we make no claims that PBIS is not an effective means of promoting positive behaviors–in fact, we salute Bertie Middle School for its outstanding implementation of the program this year! However, students themselves indicate such approaches are not primary motivators, and we are pleased with this indicator.  

Seeking assistance with any of the above items? Visit us at home.

eduConsultingFirm

 

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